1000 Level Courses

Note: Please note that not all courses are offered in each academic session. Please refer to the current course offering schedule under "courses" tab to view the courses being offered in the current academic year.

AP/HEB 1000 6.0 ELEMENTARY MODERN HEBREW, LEVEL I

This course is an introduction to Modern Hebrew designed only for students with
no previous knowledge of Hebrew. The course is structured to build students'
ability to comprehend and produce Modern Hebrew through listening, speaking,
reading and writing.

Students will learn the Hebrew alphabet, acquire basic
vocabulary, gain proficiency in reading and a grasp of elementary Hebrew
grammar and syntax. Classes are communicative with a focus on producing and
comprehending the spoken and written word. Each language skill introduced in
class is practiced through exercises and activities involving listening, speaking,
reading and writing, viewing and representing. Hebrew will be spoken during
class both by the instructor and by the students at the levels appropriate to the
language development of the class.

FORMAT: Four class hours per week.

EVALUATION: Home Assignments – 20%; Quizzes – 15%; First Semester Test
– 15%; Final Exam – 20%; Oral Presentation – 10%; Active Class Participation –
20%.

READINGS: Chayat S., Israeli S., Kobliner H., Hebrew from Scratch (Part 1).

PROJECTED ENROLMENT:35

RESERVED SPACES: N/A

PREREQUISITE: None. Not normally open to anyone ever having studied Hebrew before either formally or informally. The Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics (DLLL) Course Entry Authorization slip required
PRIOR TO ENROLLMENT.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): Laura Wiseman

Note: Students will be placed in a course at a level that suits their previous
experience. The Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics (DLLL)
reserves the right to deregister students who are found, after a proper hearing,
to have enrolled in a course for which they are over or under-qualified.

AP/HEB 1020 6.0 ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW I & II

This course introduces students to the basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax of
"Biblical" Hebrew as represented in the Bible and in ancient Hebrew inscriptions.
Students are introduced to the Hebrew writing system, basic vocabulary,
grammar and syntax.

The focus of the grammar is on the Hebrew noun and
verb, their various forms and uses. In this introductory course an attempt will be
made to introduce students to the reading of biblical Hebrew through small
selected units of text. As students' skills improve, the ability to read "original"
documents increases and class by class, students will read longer and more
sophisticated examples of ancient Hebrew prose.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HEB 1030 3.00 and AP/HEB 1040 3.00.

AP/HUMA 1850 6.0A The Bible and Modern Contexts

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

This course offers a survey of much of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the Christian Bible (New Testament). We begin with a discussion of pre-Israelite religion (i.e., a reconstruction of religion in Palestine before the composition of the Hebrew Bible) and its parallels in Mesopotamian and Egyptian religious practices and texts.

Then, we move through the texts of the Hebrew Bible from Genesis to Daniel, discussing each text's origins, themes, aims and parallels in ancient literature. In the second term we begin an examination of the New Testament noting, again, each text's origins, themes, aims and parallels in other literature of the time.

Throughout the course we will note the historical context of each of the writings, and how ideas and imagery develop over time, from one text/location to another. Students taking the course will finish having a firm grasp of how the Bible is approached in the Humanities and a sound knowledge of fundamental writings that continue to influence Western culture.

ASSIGNMENTS: Two map quizzes, weekly tutorial assignments, six unit tests, a brief research paper, a midterm and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS: David M. Carr and Colleen M. Conway. An Introduction to the Bible: Sacred Texts and Imperial Contexts. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010; and Michael Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, Carol Newsom and Pheme Perkins, eds. The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. College Edition. 4th edition. Oxford, 2010.

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 1 students.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HUMA 1850 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1870 6.0 THE BIBLE AND THE ARTS

This course looks at selected passages from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and their interpretative reflection in the western artistic tradition, including pictorial/ representational art, music, literature, and cinema.

The Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is one of the most influential works of western literature. Over the course of the centuries it has been the subject of myriad interpretations. In addition to traditional sectarian and scholarly readings, the text has served as the inspiration for countless artistic creations, ranging from novels, plays, short stories, paintings and sculptures to operas, oratorios, movies and television shows (including The Simpsons!).

Each one of these representations and retellings of these time-worn tales is also an interpretation, reflecting the specific perspective of the author/creator. In this course, we will read selected biblical stories and compare them to selected examples of their reimagined and reinterpreted versions.

The aims of the course are to teach first year students (1) how to read texts in their broadest sense, (2) how to interpret texts, (3) how to compare differing versions of the same tale/tradition, (4) how to identify and comprehend the ideology and/or theology underlying a text, (5) how to read different types of texts and (6) how to appreciate various types of artistic creations whose study and enjoyment may be new to them. In addition, the wide range of artistic creations examined in this course serves to introduce students to the temporal and genre-based wealth of the western cultural tradition.

ASSIGNMENTS: 10% Participation grade (based on attendance and participation in tutorial sections); 10% Essay proposal; 10% Essay outline; 30% Final essay; 20% Mid-year exam; 20% Final exam. (subject to change)

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: Literature: Stefan Heym, The King David Report; Zora Neale Hurston, Moses, Man of the Mountain; David Maine, Samson; David Grossman, Lion's Honey; Anita Diamant, The Red Tent; Joseph Roth, Job; Rebecca Kohn, The Gilded Chamber. Art Resources: Régis Debray, The Old Testament through 100 Masterpieces of Art; Joan Goodnick Westenholz, Images of Inspiration; Chiara de Capoa, Old Testament Figures in Art; Ellen Frankel, Illustrated Hebrew Bible. Music: Gioachino Rossini, Mosè in Egitto; Cristiano Giuseppe Lidarti, Esther; Carl Nielsen, Saul og David; Arnold Schoenberg, Moses und Aron; Camille Saint-Saens, Samson et Dalila; George Frideric Handel, Samson; Charles Gounod, Faust; Giuseppe Verdi, Nabucco. Films: The Ten Commandments (1923 & 1956 versions); Samson and Delilah (1949); David and Bathsheba (1951); The Bible (1965) King David (1985); One Night with the King (2005). (subject to change)

COURSE DIRECTOR: Carl Ehrlich (on sabbatical July 2014-June 2015).
RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 1 students.

AP/HUMA 1880 6.0A Jewish Experience: Symbiosis & Rejection

(Replaces AP/HUMA 2850 9.0A)

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies. This does not apply, however, to students majoring in Jewish Studies.

An examination of the interaction of Jews and gentiles in selected periods from antiquity through the 20th century. A case study in ethnic adaptation, the course seeks to understand how Jews sometimes adapted their lives to the world around them, and at other times withdrew into themselves, and how at certain times they exerted considerable influence on the people among whom they lived or who lived among them.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA
RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HUMA 2850 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2850 9.00.

FA/MUSI 1045 3.0 KLEZMER ENSEMBLE

Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer musical tradition. Some performance ability and knowledge of fiddle, bass, guitar, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, or trumpet is required. (Other instruments are welcomed.)

FORMAT: N/A

EVALUATION: N/A

READINGS: N/A

PROJECTED ENROLLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: N/A

PREREQUISITE: None for 1045, appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): TBA

FA/MUSI 1099A 3.0/6.0 ASHKENAZI AND SEPHARDIC VOCAL MUSIC

Private voice lessons in Ashkenazi, Klezmer, Yiddish and Sephardic (especially JudeoSpanish) singing and song repertoires. Emphasis on text clarity, stylistic awareness and repertoire development will be featured. Open to non-majors.

FORMAT: N/A

EVALUATION: N/A

READINGS: N/A

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: N/A<

PREREQUISITE: None.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): TBA

AP/YDSH 1000 6.0 ELEMENTARY YIDDISH LANGUAGE

The course focuses on basic literacy, grammar and conversation in order to prepare students to function in everyday situations in Yiddish. New vocabulary and grammatical structures are practiced through speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are introduced to aspects of Yiddish culture and the history and sociology of Yiddish-speaking Jewry through music, film, folklore and the arts.

FORMAT: Four class hours per week.

EVALUATION: Class participation and attendance - 20%, assignments - 20%, quizzes - 20%, mid-term tests (2) - 20%, final examination - 20%

READINGS:Sheva Zucker's Yiddish and Course Kit.

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: N/A

PREREQUISITE: None.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

Students will be placed in a course at a level that suits their previous experience. The Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics (DLLL) reserves the right to deregister students who are found, after a proper hearing, to have enrolled in a course for which they are over or under-qualified.