3000 Level Courses

Note: Please note that not all courses are offered in each academic session. Please refer to the current course offering schedule under "courses" tab to view the courses being offered in the current academic year.

AP/GWST 3560 3.0 Bad Girls in the Bible, Part One: Hebrew

The Bible offers archetypal figures for Western art, music and film as well as literature. This course will analyze women in the Hebrew Bible in English (Old Testament) with a focus on sexuality, seduction, murder and mayhem.

AP/HEB 3000 6.0 ADVANCED MODERN HEBREW

In this course students further develop their ability to read, write, speak and
comprehend modern Hebrew. Various aspects of Hebrew grammar will be
reviewed. Emphasis is on vocabulary enrichment, and comprehension of modern
Hebrew texts through intensive reading, writing and discussions. Computer
Programs will be used for additional practice and review of vocabulary and
grammar taught in class. This course is recommended for those who wish to do
advanced work in Hebrew or to study in Israel. Classes will be conducted in
Hebrew.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week.

EVALUATION: Written assignments - 15%; quizzes - 20%; first term test - 15%; oral presentation - 10%; class participation - 20%; final examination - 20%.

READINGS: Cohen, M. Agada Shel Safa Hebrew What a Language!. Tishler G. Verbs in Transition.

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: N/A

PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB 2000 6.0 (formerly AP/HEB 2010 6.0), or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed Grade 10 in Hebrew or above, or the equivalent, or to native speakers. Placement questionnaire required.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S):

Note: Students will be placed in a course at a level that suits their previous experience. The Department reserves the right to deregister students who are found, after a proper hearing, to have enrolled in a course for which they are over or under-qualified.

ED/HEB 3030 3.0 Y* The Teaching of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Part II

AP/HEB 3210 3.0 A Y Selections from Hebrew Legal-Religious Texts; Reading and Analysis

This course presents the structure of the core texts of the Jewish legal and religious traditions, using selections from major Hebrew legal codes, responsa literature and exegetical texts.

PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB 3000 6.00 or permission of the department. Course credit exclusion: AP/HEB 3211 3.00.

Prior TO FALL 2009:Prerequisite: AS/HEB 3000 6.00 or permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: AS/HEB 3210 3.00 and AS/HEB 3211 3.00.

     

AP/HEB 3211 3.0 Selections from Hebrew Legal-Religious Texts: Reading and Analysis (In Translation)

This course provides an overview of the beginnings and development of Jewish law. Starting with Biblical materials, we progress through the centuries to the modern world.

Attention is paid to process development and the impact of historical/sociological settings on the Jewish legal framework.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HEB 3210 3.00.

AP/HEB 3220 3.0 Hebrew Liturgical Texts: Origins, Contexts and Analysis

This course introduces a specialized genre of Hebrew literature: liturgical texts. The texts analyzed will include a variety of ancient, medieval and modern Jewish liturgies.

PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB 3000 6.00 or permission of the department. Course credit exclusion: AP/HEB 3221 3.00.

Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/HEB 3000 6.00 or permission of the department.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AS/HEB 3220 3.00 and AS/HEB 3221 3.00.

AP/HEB 3230 3.0 THE LITERATURE OF CELEBRATION AND COMMEMORATION

This course analyzes a variety of texts, classical and modern, in which aspects of major Jewish festivals and memorial days are explored.

PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB 3000 6.00 or permission of the department.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HEB 3231 3.00.

Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/HEB 3000 6.00 or permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: AS/HEB 3230 3.00 and AS/HEB 3231 3.00.

AP/HEB 3320 3.0 Exodus: Text and Classical Interpretation

A close textual analysis of the book of Exodus in the original Hebrew and of interpretations of the book written in Hebrew throughout the ages.

PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB 3000 6.00 or equivalent.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/HEB 3000 6.00 or equivalent. Course credit exclusion: AS/HEB 3320 3.00.

EVALUATION:
2 Tests 40%
2 Papers 40%
Class Participation 20%

COURSE DIRECTOR:
Martin Lockshin, lockshin@yorku.ca
206 VC, Ext. 77015

AP/HEB 3600 6.0 THEMES IN MODERN ISRAELI LITERATURE AND SOCIETY

This course is intended to introduce students to a fascinating, multifacet profile of Israeli cultural life. Mainly through readings in Modern Hebrew literature, as well as Israeli music, visual drawings and films we will reflect on the development of Israeli society from the days of Independence to present day occurrences. While we will be able to follow a historical timeline, our approach is thematic.

Through the prism of literature, music and film we will reflect on normal issues of right and wrong, "the other" in Israeli society, war and peace, despair and hope, horror and tragedy as well as joy and wonderful humour.

FORMAT: Three seminar hours per week.

EVALUATION: Papers and written assignments - 25%;
two oral presentations (each 10%) - 20%;
tests - 15%;
final examination - 20%;
participation - 20%.

READINGS: Readings from the works of Ch. N. Bialik, S.Y. Agnon, Saul Tchemikovsky, Ernst Akiva Simon, Amos Oz, Aharon Appelfeld, Aharon Meged, Isaiah Leibowitz, A.B. Yehoshua and others. Xeroxed materials will be provided at cost.

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: N/A

PREREQUISITE: AS/HEB3000 6.0 or AP/HEB3000 6.0 or equivalent.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): TBA

Note: Students will be placed in a course at a level that suits their previous experience. The Department reserves the right to deregister students who are found, after a proper hearing, to have enrolled in a course for which they are over or underqualified.

AP/HEB 3630 6.0 Israeli Cinema: Culture, Values, Art

This course introduces students to Israeli cinema as it evolved from the 1930s to the present. By studying feature films and documentaries, this course looks at film as a vehicle through which to explore questions of history, identity, conflict and reconciliation, war and peace, gender, ethnicity, the holocaust, and the tensions between individual and collective values.

PREEQUISITES:: None
Course credit exclusions: None
Cross-Listed to HUMA 3630 6.0
COURSE DIRECTOR: Sara Horowitz

AP/HIST 3110 6.0 Y Ancient Israel

Investigations include methodological limitations; Old Testament, archaeology and ideology; Israel's origins; the settlement in Canaan; Philistia and the Israelite state; the Davidic Revolutions; the twin kingdoms; Assyria, Babylonia and the end of the Israelite people.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Maynard Maidman
Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3110 6.00.

AP/HIST 3386 3.0M W Cooperation, Competition, and Conflict: Jews and non-Jews in Eastern Europe, 1914-1945

Lecture: T 10:00-11:30; R 10:00-11:30;

Beginning with a survey of life in the new states that emerged in East Central Europe after WWI (e.g. Poland, Hungary, and Lithuania) in the 1920s and 30s, this course ends with an exploration of the fate of Jews and their neighbours under Nazi and Soviet occupations during World War II. It focuses on developments within Jewish and non-Jewish societies as well as relations between Jews and non-Jews in the region throughout this period, which culminated in the deaths of millions and the near complete obliteration of a centuries-old Jewish presence there.

The period between the two world wars was one of paralleled cultural and political vibrancy in Jewish life. It saw the intensification of competing trends within Jewish society – among them, the clash between religious devotion and secularism, the development of rival nationalist and socialist movements, the striving for integration into the dominant non-Jewish culture alongside the growth of an autonomous modern cultural sphere functioning in Jewish and non-Jewish languages – against a backdrop of economic and political crises, the rise of fascism and new forms of antisemitism, and explosive tensions between national groups populating the region.

Readings drawn from:
Lucy Dawidowicz, From That Place and Time
Timothy Snyder, Blood Lands
Czeslaw Milosz, Native Realm
Laimonas Briedis, Vilnius: City of Strangers
IB Singer, My Father's Court

Assignments:
1. Student attendance and regular participation, 10%
2. map test, 10%
3. midterm exam, 25%
4. book assignment, 20 %
5. Final Exam, 35%

Course credit exclusions: None.
Grade Breakdown: TBA
Maximum Enrolment: TBA

Course Director: Keith I Weiser

AP/HIST 3555 6.0 Canadian Jewish History

A study of the origins, growth and development of the Canadian Jewish Community since the 1750's. Themes to be dealt with include immigration, Western Settlement, the Holocaust, religion, anti-Semitism, Zionism, labour, integration and continuity.

COURSE DIRECTOR: David Koffman
PREREQUISITE: N/A
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/HIST 3555 6.00.

FA/VISA 3650 3.0 ART IN CRISIS

Examines art produced in times of crisis, social and personal extremes: imprisonment, totalitarianism, political occupation, illness, war. Focuses chiefly on the Holocaust of WW2, as well as Indigenous American Reserve cultures, contemporary Palestinian art, representation of atrocity.

FORMAT: N/A

EVALUATION: N/A

READINGS: N/A

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: Non majors by permission only.

PREREQUISITE: FA/VISA 1110 6.00 or FA/VISA 2620 6.00.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS:

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): Carol Zemel

FA/VISA 3680R JEWISH ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN ANTIQUITY

Explores the visual culture of the Jews between the first and seventh centuries CE in the land of Israel and in the Diaspora, with particular focus on architecture, sculpture, mosaic and portable arts associated with synagogues and tombs.

Monuments include the Temple in Jerusalem; synagogues at Dura Europos, Hammat Tiberias, Sardis, Sepphoris, Bet Alpha, Hamman Lif, Susiya; sarcophagi and their settings in Bet Shearim and Rome; magical objects, including incantation bowls and amulets. While the course is chronological in presentation, ideological issues that pervade the study of Jewish art and recent questions dating of early synagogues, meaning of zodiac imagery are also examined.

FORMAT: N/A

EVALUATION: N/A

READINGS: N/A

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces reserved for Year 3 and Year 4 students.

PREREQUISITE: NA

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): TBA

AP/HUMA 3425 3.0 F Dead Sea Scrolls

The Dead Sea Scrolls provide an intriguing window into the development of early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. This course examines the texts, the communities which produced them, contemporary movements within Judaism and Christianity, and the major lines of interpretive controversy.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 3425 3.00, AK/HUMA
3610K 6.00 (prior to Summer 1992).

AP/HUMA 3519 6.0 Contemporary Women's Rituals: An Introduction

Women have been creating their own significant rituals both inside and outside established religious movements for centuries. This course explores this phenomenon and analyzes a variety of contemporary women's rituals in light of contemporary feminist ritual theory and methodology.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/WMST 3519 6.00 (prior to Fall 2010).

AP/HUMA 3810 6.0 ANCIENT ISRAELITE LITERATURE: THE HEBREW BIBLE/OLD TESTAMENT IN CONTEXT

A survey of the literature of ancient Israel concentrating on the Hebrew Bible with the context of its world. Students examine the text in translation and become familiar with a variety of literary, historical and theological approaches to the text.

FORMAT: N/A

EVALUATION: N/A

READINGS: N/A

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: 35

RESERVED SPACES: Spaces reserved for Humanities, Religious Studies, and Jewish Studies Majors and Minors.

PREREQUISITE: N/A

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HUMA 3415 3.00, AP/HUMA 3417 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 3415 3.00, AK/HUMA 3417 3.00, AS/HUMA 2810 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 20032004), AS/HUMA 3810 6.00.

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): TBA

AP/HUMA 3823 3.0 Greeks and Jews in the Hellenistic World

A study of the encounter of Greek religious ideas, practices and institutions with the Egyptian, Persian and Jewish religions in the period from Alexander to the First Century BCE.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 3120B 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HUMA 3823 3.00.

AP/HUMA 3825 6.0 The Holocaust in Cross-Cultural Context, Canada, Germany, Poland

This course examines how the Holocaust is represented and taught in Canada, Germany and Poland in the context of racism and multiculturalism in these three countries. It combines aspects of cultural studies, history, religious studies and literary studies.

Note: This course is open only to those students enrolled in the Concurrent Education Program.

Note: This course involves participation in a three-week field study program in Germany and Poland from late July until mid- August. As well, this course involves participation in a symposium in February. Admission to the course is by permission of the instructors.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 3120D 6.00
(prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HUMA 3825 6.00.

AP/HUMA/HIST 3829 3.0 Antisemitism from the Enlightenment to the Holocaust and Beyond

This course examines the murky and tragic twists of anti-Jewish thought and behaviour since the world became modern. It considers various forms of antisemitism in 19th-, 20th- and 21st centuries in Europe, Canada and the US, and across the globe, even in places where few or no Jews live, and seeks to make sense of the ideological, political, cultural and socio-economic developments that have produced anti-Jewish bias. It also explores Jewish responses to "the oldest hatred".

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.
READINGS: Phyllis Goldstein, A Convenient Hatred: The History of Antisemitism, 2012 + course reader.
ASSIGNMENTS: Short Written Assignments (3x20%=60%), Participation (10%), Final Exam (30%)

COURSE INSTRUCTOR: David Koffman

AP/HUMA 3831 3.0 "TORAH AND TRADITION: JEWISH RELIGIOUS EXPRESSIONS FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT"

This course offers an exploration of Jewish beliefs, institutions, and bodies of literature, emphasizing continuities and changes in religious expression within and across different places, circumstances, and times. Themes covered include God, the Jewish people, Torah and its interpretation, the land of Israel; the commandments (mitzvot) and their legal (halakhic) expressions; the Sabbath; daily and calendrical cycles of holiness; rites of passage, and messianic teachings. Particular attention will be paid to the varieties of Jewish religious denominations in modern times.

The course's learning objectives are multifold. Substantively, the course aims to impart to students a sense of the major periods in the life of Jewish religious expression and illustrate how an essential matrix of elements (God, Torah, Israel) has structured, in a recognizably continuous way, the lives of Jews while also generating new and at times highly distinct visions of God, Jewish doctrine, life cycle events, and the like. Methodologically, it emphasizes study of primary sources in translation (apart from a very few primary sources originally composed in English). In so doing, the course seeks to hone student awareness of the peculiarities of genre, the frequent indeterminacy of evidence, and difficulties involved in formulating careful historical assessments.

In paying attention to the varieties of Judaism that have come to historical expression, the course raises larger questions about the religious dimension in human affairs and about what religion is and does.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Martin Lockshin
RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Jewish Studies and Religious Studies Majors and Minors.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3831 3.00.

AP/HUMA 3840 6.0 RABBINIC JUDAISM: THOUGHT AND INSTITUTIONS

A historical analysis of the formation of the ideas, literature and institutions of rabbinic Judaism as they took shape from the first to the seventh centuries.

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Jewish Studies and Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3840 6.00.

AP/HUMA 3841 3.0 A The Emergence of Modern Yiddish Culture.

What is Yiddish? Where did it come from and where is going? What does its fate teach about Jewish life and culture and about minority languages in general? In this course we examine how Yiddish went from the folk language of a small, intensely religious society in medieval Central Europe to a language spoken by millions and supporting a modern, secular mass culture and national politics by World War II in Eastern Europe and beyond. In particular, it will concentrate on the Jewish "national renaissance" of the turn of the twentieth century, the clash between religious and secular cultures, and the conflict between Hebrew, Yiddish, and other languages. The final weeks will be devoted to experiments to create of a new Jewish culture and identity in Poland, the Soviet Union, and North America between the two World Wars and, finally, to the situation of Yiddish in the post-Holocaust world.

ASSIGNMENTS: Class participation (including quizzes) 30%; Midterm essay 30%; Final exam 40%

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: Dovid Katz, Words on Fire: the Unfinished Story of Yiddish; Jeffrey Shandler, Adventures in Yiddishland; Sholem Aleichem, Tevye the Dairyman; Eugene Avrutin et al, Photographing the Jewish Nation: Pictures from S. Ansky's Ethnographic Expedition.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Keith Weiser
RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Jewish Studies
and Religious Studies Majors and Minors.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3841 3.00.

AP/ HUMA 3850 6.0 THE FINAL SOLUTION: PERSPECTIVES ON THE HOLOCAUST

The attempt of the Nazis to annihilate world Jewry was in many ways unprecedented in human annals. It was a turning-point in history, the way for which was prepared by revolutionary political, social, technological, and philosophical developments. In other ways, however, it was a not unpredictable outgrowth of the past. Although analysis may be difficult and painful, especially for survivors, the Holocaust must be analyzed and understood if those who live on are to learn from it. Such analysis involves the examination of different aspects of life, using the tools of the historian, the theologian, the literary critic, and, to a lesser extent, the social scientist.

The course is divided into several sections, each of which approaches a different aspect of the Holocaust: the historical and philosophical background, the psychological and historical reality, the religious questions that arise in its aftermath.

ASSIGNMENTS: Two book reviews (4-6 pp. 10% each) will be required in the first term, and a longer research paper (10-15 pp. 25%) in the second term. There will be an examination in the first term (15%) and a final examination (25%). The remainder of the grade (15%) will be based on class presentations and participation. (subject to change)

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: Readings may include: William S. Allen, The Nazi Seizure of Power; Aharon Appelfeld, Badenheim, 1939; Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl; Victor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning (excerpts); A.M. Klein, The Second Scroll; Bernard Malamud, "The Lady of the Lake;" Aharon Meged, "The Name;" Emanuel Ringelblum, Notes from the Warsaw Ghetto (excerpts); Andre Schwarz-Bart, The Last of the Just;; Adele Wiseman, The Sacrifice. (subject to change).

REPRESENTATIVE FILMS: "The Grey Zone;" "The Partisans of Vilna;" "The Pianist;" "The Assault;" "Paper Clips;" "The Triumph of the Will;" "The Architecture of Doom." (subject to change)

COURSE DIRECTOR: Michael Brown
RESERVED SPACES: Spaces reserved for Humanities, Jewish Studies & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3850 6.00.

AP/HUMA 3855 6.0A Imagining the Worst : Responses to the Holocaust

This course explores responses to the Holocaust in imaginative texts - fiction, poetry and film - alongside autobiographical, historical and philosophical accounts. Works by survivors and others enable us to examine forms of Holocaust memory, and their concomitant implications.

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities, Jewish Studies & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 3000R 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HUMA 3855 6.00.

AP/HUMA 3856 3.0A WOMEN AND THE HOLOCAUST

Through the work of a small group of scholars across disciplines, there has been a growing acknowledgment of the importance of gender as a category of analysis in deepening our understanding of the past and its relevance to the present. Although both men and women were victimized by the Nazi genocide, writing by men and women victims and survivors indicates significant differences in their experiences of atrocity in ghettos, in hiding, and in concentration camps, as well as different ways of remembering and coping with the past and its aftereffects. Gender analysis enables us to discuss both the similarities and differences in the experiences and responses of men and women to the Nazi genocide, and in the ways they respond to the aftermath of extreme trauma.

In addition, scholars have observed that when we study the Holocaust, we inevitably extract from it contemporary meanings. Analyzing the images of men and women in the Holocaust in retrospective descriptions – the narratives of historical and literary accounts, as well as art, film, and popular culture – helps us better to understand the interpretations and ideological uses to which history and memory are put.

In contemporary modes of representing the Holocaust, men and women are featured in particular ways that are frequently at odds with experience and historical reality and, moreover, sometimes suppress real memory, such as recollections of sexual violation, or disruptions of parent-child bonds under Nazi atrocity. Bringing gender analysis to bear on the Nazi genocide – by examining both traces of the past (such as survivor narratives) and the role of that past in the contemporary imagination – expands the compass of Holocaust studies, and also has bearing on contemporary genocidal actions and gender-related war crimes.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sara Horowitz
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.
RESERVED SPACES: Spaces reserved for Humanities, Jewish Studies & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

FA/MUSI 3045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble

Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer musical tradition. Some performance ability and knowledge of fiddle, bass, guitar, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, or trumpet is required. (Other instruments are welcomed.) PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

FA/MUSI 3099A 3.0/6.0 Ashkenazi and Sephardic Vocal Music

Private voice lessons in Ashkenazi, Klezmer, Yiddish, and Sephardic (especially Judeo- Spanish) singing and song repertoires. Emphasis on text clarity, stylistic awareness and repertoire development will be featured. Open to majors and non-majors.

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

AP/POLS 3260 6.0 War and Peace in the Middle East

A study of the relations between Israel and its contiguous neighbours, including the historical origins of the current stalemate and an assessment of the various approaches to peacemaking in the area.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3792 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/POLS 3260 6.00,
AK/POLS 3209J 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2005-2006).
PREREQUISITE: N/A
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

AP/SOSC 3917 6.0 CONTEMPORARY JEWISH LIFE IN NORTH AMERICA

This course develops an understanding of contemporary North American Jewry using findings of social science. Social, cultural, political, and religious issues of concern to Jewish communities are analyzed, such as assimilation, intermarriage, Jewish identity, etc.

The course focuses on the Canadian Jewish experience and where relevant compares this to the United States. It also offers comparisons between Canadian Jews and other Canadian ethnic groups. The course begins with a historical overview of the major immigration patterns of Jews to North America. Canadian Census data is used to develop a demographic profile of contemporary Canadian Jewry. The course emphasizes the pluralistic nature and diversity of Canadian Jewish communities. Particular attention is paid to less studied Canadian Jewish groups, such as ultra Orthodox / Hasidic Jews, Israeli Jews, Jewish women, and gay and lesbian Jews.

FORMAT: Three hour seminar.

EVALUATION: N/A

READINGS: N/A

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: 35

RESERVED SPACES: N/A

PREREQUISITE: N/A

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): Prof. R. Schnoor.

AS/SOSC 3918 6.0 SEPHARDI JEWS:Sephardi Jews of Muslim Lands

The meeting between Jews and Arabs in the context of the Arab-Israeli conflict is famous. Less familiar is the encounter between Muslims and Jews in Muslim lands. This course explores Jewish life under Islam from the rise of Islam until modern times, with a special focus on Sephardi Jews. Setting the stage is an overview of the religious, political, communal, material and intellectual settings of the Judeo-Muslim experience during the Middle Ages, when a large majority of the Jewish people subsisted under Muslim rule.

The second part explores such themes as cultural cross-pollination, the Jews' legal status under Islam in theory and practice, interfaith polemics and religious unorthodoxy as arenas of interaction and the parameters of Jewish communal autonomy in Islamic lands. The third part explores how this culture was affected by regional and international political and economic change with the advent of modernity and European colonialism. Emphasis is placed on classroom analyses of translated primary source material, informed by background readings.

FORMAT: Three hour seminar.

EVALUATION: First term essay, 25%; second term essay, 25%; final exam, 30%; attendance & participation, 20%. .

READINGS: N/A

PROJECTED ENROLMENT: N/A

RESERVED SPACES: N/A

PREREQUISITE: N/A

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

COURSE DIRECTOR(S): Isaac Hollander