Current Course Offerings

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Jewish Studies Lecture Schedule 2018-19 (PDF)
Jewish Studies Lecture Schedule 2017-18 (PDF)
Jewish Studies Lecture Schedule 2016-17 (PDF)
Jewish Studies Lecture Schedule 2015-16 (PDF)

Below are the current course offerings for the 2018-19 academic year.

GENDER & WOMEN STUDIES

AP/GWST 3560 3.0 (FALL)
The Bible offers archetypal figures for Western art, music, and film as well as literature. This course will analyze women in the Hebrew Bible in English (Old Testament) with a focus on sexuality, seduction, murder, and mayhem. Note: AP/GWST 3560 3.00 may be taken independently of AP/GWST 3561 3.00. Course credit exclusions: AP/HUMA 3436 3.00 (prior to Fall 2011). Previously offered as AP/WMST 3560 3.00, GL/WMST 3560 3.00.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ruby K Newman

HISTORY

AP/HIST 2110 6.0 The Ancient Near East
This course surveys the history of some of the oldest civilizations of the world and their immediate successors: Sumer, Akkad, Assyria, Babylonia, Egypt, Hittite-land, Canaan, and Israel. Problems of how to determine the facts of ancient history are also discussed.
Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 1090 6.00.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Carl S Ehrlich

HEBREW

AP/HEB 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Hebrew, Level I
This course is designed only for students with no previous knowledge of Hebrew. It introduces students to the Hebrew alphabet, basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax of Modern Hebrew. The course is structured to build students' ability to comprehend and speak Modern Hebrew. Classes are communicative and activities involve listening, speaking, reading and writing.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ahouva Shulman

AP/HEB 1020 6.0 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I & II
This course introduces students to the basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax of "Biblical" Hebrew as represented in the Bible and in ancient Hebrew inscriptions. Students are introduced to the Hebrew writing system, basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. The focus of the grammar is on the Hebrew noun and verb, their various forms and uses. In this introductory course, an attempt will be made to introduce students to the reading of biblical Hebrew through small selected units of text. As students' skills improve, the ability to read "original" documents increases and class by class, students will read longer and more sophisticated examples of ancient Hebrew prose.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ahouva Shulman

AP HEB 2000 6.0 Intermediate Modern Hebrew
Review and consolidation of grammar topics to achieve a balance in the students' competence in written and oral skills. Further development in speaking, reading, and writing. Course material deals with everyday situations, Jewish history, culture and aspects of life in Israel.
Prerequisite: AP/HEB 1000 6.00 or equivalent; not normally open to students with more than seven years of elementary school level Hebrew or equivalent.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ahouva Shulman

AP/HEB 3000 6.0 Advanced Modern Hebrew, Level II
A course in modern Hebrew, emphasizing the study of contemporary Israeli language as seen in a wide variety of writings (education, business, military and religious literature, as well as newspapers, periodicals, and some belles lettres). This course includes practice in writing and composition.
Prerequisite: AP/HEB 2000 6.00 or equivalent. Not normally open to students with three or more years of high school level Hebrew or to native speakers.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ahouva Shulman

HUMANITIES

AP/HUMA 1870 6.0A The Bible and the Arts
This course looks at selected passages from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and their interpretative reflection in the western artistic tradition, including pictorial/representational art, music, literature, and cinema. 

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

AP/HUMA 3519 6.0A Contemporary Women's Ritual
Women have been creating their own significant rituals both inside and outside established religious movements for centuries. This course explores this phenomenon and analyzes a variety of contemporary women's rituals in light of contemporary feminist ritual theory and methodology. Previously offered as AP/WMST 3519 6.00.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sherry Rowley

AP/HUMA 3831 3.0M W Torah and Tradition: Jewish Religious Expressions from Antiquity to the Present (ONLINE)
This course offers an exploration of Jewish beliefs, institutions, and bodies of literature, emphasizing continuities and changes in religious expression within and across different places, circumstances, and times. Themes covered include God, the Jewish people, Torah and its interpretation, the land of Israel; the commandments (mitzvot) and their legal (halakhic) expressions; the Sabbath; daily and calendrical cycles of holiness; rites of passage, and messianic teachings. Particular attention will be paid to the varieties of Jewish religious denominations in modern times.

The course's learning objectives are multifold. Substantively, the course aims to impart to students a sense of the major periods in the life of Jewish religious expression and illustrate how an essential matrix of elements (God, Torah, Israel) has structured, in a recognizably continuous way, the lives of Jews while also generating new and at times highly distinct visions of God, Jewish doctrine, life cycle events, and the like. Methodologically, it emphasizes the study of primary sources in translation (apart from a very few primary sources originally composed in English). In so doing, the course seeks to hone student awareness of the peculiarities of the genre, the frequent indeterminacy of evidence, and difficulties involved in formulating careful historical assessments.

In paying attention to the varieties of Judaism that have come to historical expression, the course raises larger questions about the religious dimension in human affairs and about what religion is and does.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Martin Lockshin

AP/HUMA 3850 6.0A The Final Solution: Perspectives on the Holocaust
The attempt of the Nazis to annihilate world Jewry was in many ways unprecedented in human annals. It was a turning point in history, the way for which was prepared by revolutionary political, social, technological, and philosophical developments. In other ways, however, it was a not unpredictable outgrowth of the past. Although analysis may be difficult and painful, especially for survivors, the Holocaust must be analyzed and understood if those who live on are to learn from it. Such analysis involves the examination of different aspects of life, using the tools of the historian, the theologian, the literary critic, and, to a lesser extent, the social scientist.

The course is divided into several sections, each of which approaches a different aspect of the Holocaust: the historical and philosophical background, the psychological and historical reality, the religious questions that arise in its aftermath.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Michael Brown

AP/HUMA 3855 6.0A Responses to the Holocaust
This course explores responses to the Holocaust in imaginative texts - fiction, poetry, and film - alongside autobiographical, historical and philosophical accounts. Works by survivors and others enable us to examine forms of Holocaust memory and their concomitant implications.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sara Horowitz

AP/HUMA 4803 6.0A/AP/HIST 4225 6.0A Church, Mosque and Synagogue : Jews, Muslims and Christians in Medieval Spain
The Muslim conquest of the Iberian peninsula in 711 inaugurated a complex trireligious society that was to endure nearly eight hundred years (and more than eight centuries on the Muslim lunar calendar). This development has given rise to Spain's designation as a "land of three religions" and Spain's reputation as premodern western Europe's foremost "pluralist" society. It has also made Spain, as compared with other European lands, a hard country for non-Spaniards to understand.

This course seeks to explore diverse facets of Jewish-Muslim-Christian convivencia ("dwelling together"; coexistence), a topic that continues to be the object of attention for a range of scholars and many beyond the academy who have found it pertinent to an understanding of our own age. The course focusses on religious, intellectual, and cultural contacts and their sociopsychological dynamics, placing these in various historical and at times (very partial) geographic, linguistic, political, economic, and technological contexts. The course centers on written sources but does not wholly neglect iconography, music, and architecture. It stresses diverse perspectives within and across religious boundaries and at times forces us to ponder difficulties faced by scholars seeking to explain religious or religiously-linked phenomena (e.g., what actual human experience lies behind the metaphor of "religious conversion"?).

Methodologically, our enterprise emphasizes study of primary sources as the only way to arrive at a trustworthy model of convivencia. In the course of such study, attention is paid to peculiarities of genre, the frequent indeterminacy of evidence, and difficulties involved in formulating historical assessments.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

AP/HUMA 4818 3.0M (WINTER) Shaping Jewish Memory
This course explores how Jewish communities and individuals have remembered, interpreted and given meaning to the past to shape identity and values. It studies fiction, non-fiction, photographs, films, liturgy, and other vehicles of memory.
Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 4818 6.00.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sara Horowitz

AP/HUMA 4824 3.0A (FALL) Imagining Anne Frank
Analyzes Anne Frank's World War II diary from literary, cultural, and historical perspectives. Examines the evolution of Frank and the diary as cultural icons by analyzing representations of Frank as a figure in literature, including novels, poems, films, theatre, exhibitions, memoirs, and other people's diaries, with an eye to personal, collective, and historical memory.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sara Horowitz

MUSIC

FA/MUSI 1045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer/Yiddish song musical traditions. Some performance ability and knowledge of violin, bass, guitar, cello, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, trombone, flute or trumpet is required. Other instruments—including voice— are welcomed. Prerequisite: None for 1045, appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Brian Katz

FA/MUSI 1099A 3.0/6.0 Ashkenazi and Sephardic Vocal Music
Private voice lessons in Ashkenazi, Klezmer, Yiddish, and Sephardic (especially JudeoSpanish) singing and song repertoires. Emphasis on text clarity, stylistic awareness and repertoire development will be featured. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sherry Johnson

FA/MUSI 2045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer/Yiddish song musical traditions. Some performance ability and knowledge of violin, bass, guitar, cello, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, trombone, flute or trumpet is required. Other instruments—including voice— are welcomed. Prerequisite: None for 1045, appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Brian Katz

FA/MUSI 2099A 3.0/6.0 Ashkenazi and Sephardic Vocal Music

Private voice lessons in Ashkenazi, Klezmer, Yiddish, and Sephardic (especially JudeoSpanish) singing and song repertoires. Emphasis on text clarity, stylistic awareness and repertoire development will be featured. Open to majors and non-majors.

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sherry Johnson

FA/MUSI 3045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer/Yiddish song musical traditions. Some performance ability and knowledge of violin, bass, guitar, cello, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, trombone, flute or trumpet is required. Other instruments—including voice— are welcomed. Prerequisite: None for 1045, appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Brian Katz

FA/MUSI 3099A 3.0/6.0 Ashkenazi and Sephardic Vocal Music
Private voice lessons in Ashkenazi, Klezmer, Yiddish, and Sephardic (especially JudeoSpanish) singing and song repertoires. Emphasis on text clarity, stylistic awareness and repertoire development will be featured. Open to majors and non-majors.

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor.
COURSE DIRECTOR: Sherry Johnson

FA/MUSI 4045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer/Yiddish song musical traditions. Some performance ability and knowledge of violin, bass, guitar, cello, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, trombone, flute or trumpet is required. Other instruments—including voice— are welcomed. Prerequisite: None for 1045, appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Brian Katz

FA/MUSI 4099A 3.0/6.0 Ashkenazi and Sephardic Vocal Music

Private voice lessons in Ashkenazi, Klezmer, Yiddish, and Sephardic (especially JudeoSpanish) singing and song repertoires. Emphasis on text clarity, stylistic awareness and repertoire development will be featured. Open to majors and non-majors.

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor.
COURSE DIRECTOR: Sherry Johnson

POLITICAL SCIENCE

AP/POLS 4561 3.0 Topics in Middle East Politics
This course prepares students to work in Middle Eastern Studies with an emphasis on political debates. We examine the history of state building, regional issues, nationalism, ideological trends, political movements and political parties in the modern Middle East.

COURSE DIRECTOR: David B Dewitt

SOCIAL SCIENCE

AP/SOSC 3917 6.0 Contemporary Jewish Life in North America
This course develops an understanding of contemporary North American Jewry using findings of social science. Social, cultural, political, and religious issues of concern to Jewish communities are analyzed, such as assimilation, intermarriage, Jewish identity, etc. The course focuses on the Canadian Jewish experience and where relevant compares this to the United States. It also offers comparisons between Canadian Jews and other Canadian ethnic groups. The course begins with a historical overview of the major immigration patterns of Jews to North America. Canadian Census data is used to develop a demographic profile of contemporary Canadian Jewry. The course emphasizes the pluralistic nature and diversity of Canadian Jewish communities. Particular attention is paid to less studied Canadian Jewish groups, such as ultra-Orthodox / Hasidic Jews, Israeli Jews, Jewish women, and gay and lesbian Jews.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

 

Important: Course Substitution and Waivers