Current Course Offerings

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Jewish Studies Lecture Schedule 2016-17 (PDF)

Jewish Studies Lecture Schedule 2015-16 (PDF)

Below are the current course offerings in 2016/2017. Detailed information regarding evaluation/grade breakdown and  required readings is available in the Jewish Studies 2016-17 mini-calendar (found under undergraduate programs).

HEBREW

AP/HEB 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Hebrew, Level I
This course is designed only for students with no previous knowledge of Hebrew. It introduces students to the Hebrew alphabet, basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax of Modern Hebrew. The course is structured to build students' ability to comprehend and speak Modern Hebrew. Classes are communicative and activities involve listening, speaking, reading and writing.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ahouva Shulman
PREREQUISITE: None. Not normally open to students who studied Hebrew before either formally or informally. Placement questionnaire is required
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

AP/HEB 1020 6.0 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I & II
This course introduces students to the basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax of "Biblical" Hebrew as represented in the Bible and in ancient Hebrew inscriptions. Students are introduced to the Hebrew writing system, basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax. The focus of the grammar is on the Hebrew noun and verb, their various forms and uses. In this introductory course an attempt will be made to introduce students to the reading of biblical Hebrew through small selected units of text. As students' skills improve, the ability to read "original" documents increases and class by class, students will read longer and more sophisticated examples of ancient Hebrew prose.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ahouva Shulman
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HEB 1030 3.00 and AP/HEB 1040 3.00.

AP/HEB 2000 6.0 Intermediate Modern Hebrew
This course is intended to improve the student's ability to read, write, speak and comprehend Modern Hebrew. Although the course presupposes the equivalent of one year of elementary Hebrew, a systematic review of grammar is included. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and comprehension of Modern Hebrew texts through reading of short stories and discussions. Computer programs will be used for additional practice and review of vocabulary and grammar taught in class.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Yael Seliger
PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB1000 6.0 or AP/HEB1010 6.0 or the equivalent. Placement questionnaire is required.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AS/HEB2010 6.0

AP/HEB 3000 6.0 Advanced Modern Hebrew
In this course students further develop their ability to read, write, speak and comprehend Modern Hebrew. Various aspects of Hebrew grammar will be reviewed. Emphasis is on vocabulary enrichment, and comprehension of Modern Hebrew texts through intensive reading, writing and discussions. Computer Programs will be used for additional practice and review of vocabulary and grammar taught in class. This course is recommended for those who wish to do advanced work in Hebrew or to study in Israel. Classes will be conducted in Hebrew.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ahouva Shulman
PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB 2000 6.0 (formerly AP/HEB 2010 6.0), or equivalent. Placement questionnaire required.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

ED/HEB 3030 Teaching Classical Hebrew Texts in Jewish Studies Part II
Standards, benchmarks and taxonomies for the teaching of classical Hebrew texts in Jewish Studies. Seminar emphasizes planning and pedagogies for teaching Bible, Talmudic texts, Liturgy, and primary documents in Jewish History. Curricular considerations for Jewish Studies reliant on Heritage Hebrew.

Note: Open to ED III candidates in the Jewish Teacher Education Program

COURSE DIRECTOR: Laura Wiseman

AP HEB 3230 3.0 Literature of Celebration and Commemoration
This course analyzes a variety of texts, classical and modern, in which aspects of major Jewish festivals and memorial days are explored.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA
PREREQUISITE:  AP/HEB 3000 6.0 or permission of the Department.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HEB 3231 3.00. Prior to FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HEB 3230 3.00 and AS/HEB 3231 3.00.

AP HEB 3600 6.0 Themes in Modern Israeli Literature & Society
An exploration of some major currents in contemporary Hebrew literature; how do Israeli writers respond and reflect upon the daily challenges of Israeli life? Internationally acclaimed, gifted Israeli authors help us better understand the moral, social and cultural challenges confronting the Israeli nation; its joys and sorrows, hope and despair, solidarity and conflict, pride and shame, confidence and fear.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Yael Seliger
PREREQUISITE: AP/HEB 3000 6.00 or equivalent. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/HEB 3000 6.00 or equivalent
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None. Prior to FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HEB 3600 6.00

HUMANITIES

AP/HUMA 1880 6.0A Jewish Experience: Symbiosis & Rejection (Replaces AP/HUMA 2850 9.0A)
Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies. This does not apply, however, to students majoring in Jewish Studies.

That Jews are distinct from non-Jews is a basic axiom of Jewish thought and literature and a seemingly obvious lesson of Jewish history. But is the basis of this distinction biological, religious, psychological, sociological, or some combination of the above? And in what ways have Jewish beliefs, teachings, and practices interacted with ideas, rituals or habits of daily life associated with diverse non-Jewish environments? This course seeks answers to these and related questions by exploring the relationship of Jews and their neighbours from biblical through contemporary times; that is, it investigates the ongoing interactions and mutual transformation of Jewish teachings and the Jewish people in their diversity with the peoples and cultures among whom Jews have lived. In so doing, the course exemplifies general processes of religious, cultural, and social interchange and the types of creative influences or mutual frictions and rivalries (sometimes culminating in violence) that such processes can yield. In short, we study the Jewish experience to gain insight into the human experience. (Note that this course is not about Judaism or Jewish history per se; that is, we do not speak systematically about Jewish thought, rituals, and so forth.)
As a first-year general education course, this course seeks to develop skills in the areas of critical thinking, reading and writing. Beyond familiarity with the outline of events and ideas, the course aims to cultivate a variety of such skills—especially the drawing of conclusions from diverse historical and literary sources. It achieves this end through its emphasis on analysis of original historical, intellectual and literary documents (and, occasionally, images). In the course of writing essays, students apply techniques of interpretation learned in the course while enhancing their ability to present ideas clearly, coherently and persuasively in accordance with the rules of grammar and good English usage. If necessary, we will, at points in the course, work formally on improving our ability to write correctly (i.e., in accordance with rules of grammar, punctuation, and so forth) and well!

COURSE DIRECTOR: Yedida Eisenstat
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HUMA 2850 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014). PRIOR TO FALL
2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2850 9.00.

AP/HUMA 3810 6.0A Ancient Israelite Literature: The Hebrew Bible /Old Testament in Context
A survey of the literature of ancient Israel concentrating on the Hebrew Bible with the context of its world. Students examine the text in translation and become familiar with a variety of literary, historical and theological approaches to the text.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Matthew Feuer
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HUMA 3415 3.00, AP/HUMA 3417 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 3415 3.00, AK/HUMA 3417 3.00, AS/HUMA 2810 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HUMA 3810 6.00.

AP/HUMA 3831 3.0M W Torah and Tradition: Jewish Religious Expressions from Antiquity to the Present (ONLINE)
This course offers an exploration of Jewish beliefs, institutions, and bodies of literature, emphasizing continuities and changes in religious expression within and across different places, circumstances, and times. Themes covered include God, the Jewish people, Torah and its interpretation, the land of Israel; the commandments (mitzvot) and their legal (halakhic) expressions; the Sabbath; daily and calendrical cycles of holiness; rites of passage, and messianic teachings. Particular attention will be paid to the varieties of Jewish religious denominations in modern times.

The course's learning objectives are multifold. Substantively, the course aims to impart to students a sense of the major periods in the life of Jewish religious expression and illustrate how an essential matrix of elements (God, Torah, Israel) has structured, in a recognizably continuous way, the lives of Jews while also generating new and at times highly distinct visions of God, Jewish doctrine, life cycle events, and the like. Methodologically, it emphasizes study of primary sources in translation (apart from a very few primary sources originally composed in English). In so doing, the course seeks to hone student awareness of the peculiarities of genre, the frequent indeterminacy of evidence, and difficulties involved in formulating careful historical assessments.

In paying attention to the varieties of Judaism that have come to historical expression, the course raises larger questions about the religious dimension in human affairs and about what religion is and does.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Martin Lockshin
PRREQUSITES: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: PRIOR TO FALL 2009 : AS/HUMA 3831 3.00.

AP/HUMA 3840 6.0A Law, Ethics and Revelation in Judaism
This course will explore the idea of revelation in Judaism and how that idea reverberates throughout the history of rabbinic Judaism, from ancient times to the present. This idea will be a touchstone throughout the examination of the origins of rabbinic Judaism; the study of rabbinic genres of composition; Jewish ritual and practice; and the similarities and differences between modern Jewish denominations. With that background knowledge, our focus will then turn to modern questions of Jewish law and the different answers offered by different denominations. Our goal will be to better understand the legal, ethical and religious priorities at the heart of each of these modern quandaries and why different rabbis respond to these modern problems differently. We will examine such topics as abortion, "chosenness," capital punishment, euthanasia, feminism, and Zionism. In doing so, our goal will be to cultivate a deeper understanding of the history of rabbinic Judaism, its literatures and the halakhic (Jewish legal) process.
This course uses the specific case of rabbinic Judaism and its questions, struggles and literatures as the means of exploring larger human questions: How to be a good person? What are the values that should guide one's behaviour and life choices? Need those values originate from the divine or can they be man made?

COURSE DIRECTOR: Yedida Einsenstat
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3840 6.00.

AP/HUMA 3850 6.0A The Final Solution: Perspectives on the Holocaust
The attempt of the Nazis to annihilate world Jewry was in many ways unprecedented in human annals. It was a turning-point in history, the way for which was prepared by revolutionary political, social, technological, and philosophical developments. In other ways, however, it was a not unpredictable outgrowth of the past. Although analysis may be difficult and painful, especially for survivors, the Holocaust must be analyzed and understood if those who live on are to learn from it. Such analysis involves the examination of different aspects of life, using the tools of the historian, the theologian, the literary critic, and, to a lesser extent, the social scientist.

The course is divided into several sections, each of which approaches a different aspect of the Holocaust: the historical and philosophical background, the psychological and historical reality, the religious questions that arise in its aftermath.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Michael Brown
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3850 6.00

AP/HUMA 4750 3.0 M W Gender and Sexuality in Jewish Life

This course offers an exploration of distinctive Jewish approaches to questions of gender, sexuality, and the body, as formulated in their historical, religious, ethical and social dimensions. While we begin our journey with Biblical and other traditional sources, we focus most of our attention on contemporary encounters between gender/sexuality and Jewish life and the gendered nature of religious practice and religious authority. The course explores normative constructions of women's and men's societal and sexual roles in law and custom, and compares these to social realities.

Our analysis is situated within wider theoretical frameworks which include discussions of feminism, queer theory and social constructionism. The objective of the course is to use the theoretical categories of gender and sexuality as analytical tools to help us enrich our understanding of Judaism and Jewish life.

Particular topics include:

-explorations around the inclusion/exclusion of women in Jewish religious life, both historically and in the contemporary period.

-social and religious constructions of masculinity and femininity in a Jewish context

-the relationship of gay/lesbian identities to Judaism and Jewish life; we document the variety of Jewish approaches to gay and lesbian realities and the changing nature of these encounters (this includes LGBT participation in synagogue ritual, Jewish marriage and Jewish communal life)

-exploring the understudied area of transgender identities in Jewish life; we examine traditional Jewish sources which address this phenomenon and examine how transgender issues are playing out in contemporary Jewish life.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Matthew Feuer
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None

AP/HUMA 4803 6.0A/AP/HIST 4225 6.0A Church, Mosque and Synagogue : Jews, Muslims and Christians in Medieval Spain
The Muslim conquest of the Iberian peninsula in 711 inaugurated a complex trireligious society that was to endure nearly eight hundred years (and more than eight centuries on the Muslim lunar calendar). This development has given rise to Spain's designation as a "land of three religions" and Spain's reputation as premodern western Europe's foremost "pluralist" society. It has also made Spain, as compared with other European lands, a hard country for non-Spaniards to understand.

This course seeks to explore diverse facets of Jewish-Muslim-Christian convivencia ("dwelling together"; coexistence), a topic that continues to be the object of attention for a range of scholars and many beyond the academy who have found it pertinent to an understanding of our own age. The course focusses on religious, intellectual, and cultural contacts and their sociopsychological dynamics, placing these in various historical and at times (very partial) geographic, linguistic, political, economic, and technological contexts. The course centers on written sources but does not wholly neglect iconography, music, and architecture. It stresses diverse perspectives within and across religious boundaries and at times forces us to ponder difficulties faced by scholars seeking to explain religious or religiously-linked phenomena (e.g., what actual human experience lies behind the metaphor of "religious conversion"?).

Methodologically, our enterprise emphasizes study of primary sources as the only way to arrive at a trustworthy model of convivencia. In the course of such study, attention is paid to peculiarities of genre, the frequent indeterminacy of evidence, and difficulties involved in formulating historical assessments.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Alexandra Guerson
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 4000V 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HUMA 4803 6.00.

AP/HUMA 4821 3.0 A Culture, Society and Values in Israel
This course decodes aspects of culture, society and values in Israel through contemporary Israeli literature—mainly short stories and poems—seasoned lightly with visual art, artifact, film, television and cuisine. Texts will be read and discussed in English.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Laura Wiseman
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

 

HISTORY

AP/HIST 3110 6.0 Ancient Israel: From its Origins in the Settlement to the Babylonian Exile
Investigations include methodological limitations; Old Testament, archaeology and ideology; Israel's origins; the settlement in Canaan; Philistia and the Israelite state; the Davidic Revolutions; the twin kingdoms; Assyria, Babylonia; and how the Israelites became the Jewish people.
Among the issues to be considered are the strengths and limitations of archaeological interpretation, Biblical narrative, and primary written sources. Against this background, Israel’s political history from the end of the Late Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age is examined with special emphasis on geopolitical phenomena.

COURSE DIRECTOR: M.P Maidman
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3110 6.00.

AP/HIST 3261 3.0 Creating Israel: the Zionist Idea, 1870-1948 (WINTER)
This course studies the emergence of Zionism as a Jewish national movement in the 19th century, arguments for and against Zionism made in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the conflicts and debates among Zionist thinkers over their ideas and visions. It also examines debates about events leading to the birth of the State of Israel in 1948. One of the most consequential and controversial events of the twentieth century is the emergence in 1948 of the State of Israel, the first Jewish state since antiquity, under the auspices of the Zionist movement. Drawing on both religious tradition and the concepts of secular modern nationalism, it promised to remedy Jews’ political and social ills– above all,antisemitism, assimilation, and the lack of self-determination – by undoing their 2000 year “exile” from their ancient homeland. Its goals and methods to establish a Jewish national home in Ottoman (later, British) Palestine and radically to reshape Jewish culture and identity met with both fervent support and vehement opposition among Jews and non-Jews.
By reading major voices for Zionism and their critics, we study the context for the emergence of Zionism as a Jewish national movement in the 19th century, arguments for and against it made in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the conflicts and debates among Zionist thinkers over their ideas and visions. We also examine efforts to realize these ideas. Topics include ideological antecedents to Zionism; Jewish nationalist and anti-nationalist alternatives to Zionism; Zionism as a secular rebellion against tradition; Zionism as messianic movement; the rejection of Diaspora Jewish culture and the creation of a new, Zionist culture; the revival of Hebrew; the place of Arabs and “Arab Jews” in Zionist culture; the movement for a bi-national Arab-Jewish state; the Palestinian critique of Zionism; historians’ controversy over the 1948 Arab-Israeli War; the relationship of Israel to the Jewish Diaspora.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Keith Weiser
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

AP/HIST 3386 3.0M (WINTER TERM) Cooperation, Competition, and Conflict: Jews and non-Jews in Eastern Europe, 1914-1945
Following World War I, most European Jews found themselves living in states such as Poland, Lithuania, Rumania, Hungary and Czechoslovakia that emerged from the wreckage of the Habsburg and Tsarist Empires. A post-war democratic order that accorded recognition to the principle of national self-determination promised them and their non-Jewish neighbours unprecedented opportunities to fulfill political and cultural ambitions as both individual citizens and as collectives. The period between the two world wars was one of paralleled cultural and political vibrancy in Jewish life. It saw the intensification of competing trends within Jewish society – among them, the clash between religious devotion and secularism, the development of rival nationalist and socialist movements, the striving for integration into the dominant non-Jewish culture alongside the growth of an autonomous modern cultural sphere functioning in Jewish and non-Jewish languages – against a backdrop of economic and political crises, new forms of antisemitism, and explosive tensions between national groups populating the region.
Beginning with a survey of life in the new states of East Central Europe in the 1920s and 30s, this course ends with an exploration the fate of Jews and their neighbours under Nazi and Soviet occupations during World War II. It focuses on developments within Jewish societies as well as relations between Jews and non-Jews in the region throughout this period, which culminated in the deaths of millions and the near complete obliteration of a centuries-old Jewish presence there.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Keith Weiser
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

AP/HUMA/HIST 3829 3.0 Antisemitism from the Enlightenment to the Holocaust and Beyond
This course examines the evolution of anti-Jewish thought and behaviour as a response to the crisis of modernity. It examines the role of antisemitism in 19th- and 20th-century European ideological, political and socio-economic developments and the Jewish responses to antisemitism.

Britain’s former Chief Rabbi, Jonathan Sacks has suggested that “Anti-Semitism, the ‘oldest hatred,’ is ultimately dislike of the unlike—the fear mutating into hate of the stranger. ... Anti-Semitism, though it begins with Jews, never ends with Jews. It is the paradigm case of the hatred of difference.” Like everything else, hatred has a history. This course explores the twisted intellectual and historical road of Jew-hatred in the modern period. We will treat topics including Christian anti-Judaism, the invention of the Jewish “race,” conspiratorial thinking, the Nazi path to genocide, and anti-Zionism, as well as some perhaps less suspecting aspects of anti-Jewish sentiment, including its relationship with homophobia, self-hatred, and philosemitism (love of the Jews). We’ll examine issues large and small: the forces that shaped the 20th century, as well as conflicts close to home, even on our campus.

COURSE DIRECTOR: David Koffman
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3829 3.00.

 

 

MUSIC

FA/MUSI 1045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer musical tradition. Some performance ability and knowledge of fiddle, bass, guitar, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion or trumpet is required. (Other instruments are welcomed.)

PREREQUISITE: None for 1045, appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

FA/MUSI 2045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer musical tradition. Some performance ability and knowledge of fiddle, bass, guitar, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion or trumpet is required. (Other instruments are welcomed.)

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

FA/MUSI 2099A 3.0/6.0 Ashkenazi and Sephardic Vocal Music
Private voice lessons in Ashkenazi, Klezmer, Yiddish, and Sephardic (especially JudeoSpanish) singing and song repertoires. Emphasis on text clarity, stylistic awareness and repertoire development will be featured. Open to majors and non-majors.

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

FA/MUSI 3045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer musical tradition. Some performance ability and knowledge of fiddle, bass, guitar, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, or trumpet is required. (Other instruments are welcomed.)

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

FA/MUSI 4045 3.0 Klezmer Ensemble
Practical performance instruction in the Klezmer musical tradition. Some performance ability and knowledge of fiddle, bass, guitar, piano, clarinet, sax, accordion, or trumpet is required. (Other instruments are welcomed.)

PREREQUISITE: Appropriate lower level or permission of the instructor required for upper level registration. Open to majors and non-majors.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: N/A

POLITICAL SCIENCE

AP/POLS 3260 6.0 War and Peace in the Middle East
This course examines the causes of conflicts in the Middle East. The history of foreign powers' involvement in the region, religious fundamentalism, authoritarianism, economic development and politics of oil and water provide the background to the conflicts. The second term focuses specifically on Arab-Israeli wars, the peace process, the conflicts in the Persian Gulf including the Iranian revolution and the Gulf Wars.

Themes: Global Politics Law, Social Justice, & Ethics Violence & Security

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AK/AS/POLS 3260 6.00,AK/POLS 3209J 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2005-2006).

SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

AP/SOSC 3917 6.0 Contemporary Jewish Life in North America
This course develops an understanding of contemporary North American Jewry using findings of social science. Social, cultural, political, and religious issues of concern to Jewish communities are analyzed, such as assimilation, intermarriage, Jewish identity, etc. The course focuses on the Canadian Jewish experience and where relevant compares this to the United States. It also offers comparisons between Canadian Jews and other Canadian ethnic groups. The course begins with a historical overview of the major immigration patterns of Jews to North America. Canadian Census data is used to develop a demographic profile of contemporary Canadian Jewry. The course emphasizes the pluralistic nature and diversity of Canadian Jewish communities. Particular attention is paid to less studied Canadian Jewish groups, such as ultra-Orthodox / Hasidic Jews, Israeli Jews, Jewish women, and gay and lesbian Jews.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Randal Schnoor
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

GENDER & WOMEN STUDIES

AP/GL GWST 3560 3.0 Bad Girls in the Bible, Part One: Hebrew
The Bible offers archetypal figures for Western art, music and film as well as literature. This course will analyze women in the Hebrew Bible in English (Old Testament) with a focus on sexuality, seduction, murder and mayhem. Note: AP/GWST 3560 3.00 may be taken independently of AP/GWST 3561 3.00.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Ruby K.Newman
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HUMA 3436 3.00 (prior to Fall 2011), AP/GL/WMST 3560 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HUMA 3436 3.00.

 

Important: Course Substitution and Waivers